titres-medical-socialaid

titres-medical-socialaid

Medical care

In areas of great need, Empart provides medical care and education in hygiene and health issues which help to improve living conditions within communities. Through our established churches, Empart offers World Health Organization approved programmes which are aimed  primarily at helping women and children. Occasionally, churches employ local doctors for a day as well so that people from remote communities can receive appropriate medical treatment.

Young volunteers service

Raising the youth

Young people in South Asia represent a large proportion of the population and are an amazing resource that is often overlooked and under-utilized. Despite the fact that many of these youth lack education, resources and job skills, there is still a valuable and significant role they can play in community development. Through the Young Volunteers’ Service project, Empart wants to see these young people empowered to make a difference. Volunteering is a rewarding experience for both the young people involved and society as a whole. Empart desires to see these young people filled with the passion and life of Jesus, ready to engage effectively and positively for their country.

 

To live and help live

With the motto ‘to live and help live’, young believers are encouraged to help people in need and to participate in the development of their communities. They are taught social values of the gospel and the principles of volunteerism. Armed with a developing social conscience and genuine compassion for their neighbours and community, services offered by volunteers can include cleaning public places, caring for the environment, literacy programmes, medical care to list a few.

Mercy homes

So many of South Asia’s mentally challenged people are left to fend for themselves on the streets. They are often regarded as demon-possessed and are highly rejected by society. Within Empart, mercy homes began when one of the field worker felt a calling to reach this marginalized group by caring for the outcast and setting them on a path towards restoration. The first ever Mercy home was established the field worker’s own home.

 

Over the years, this initiative has grown and is having a tremendous impact on individuals, their families and surrounding communities. Many guests have made tremendous progress and some have even been healed, set free and released to be field workers themselves.

Widow’s homes

More and more elderly people in South Asia are seeing themselves abandoned by families who either cannot, or don’t want to care for them. As the economy grows, lifestyle changes and traditional family structures are weakened. As a result, a growing number of older people are left abandoned, and this with no public assistance available for support. Senior’s homes are more than a pioneering project. It is a way of caring for these people, giving them back dignity and sharing the love of God with them in the latter part of their lives.

 

In remote villages, the plight of widows can be very difficult. In a patriarchal society where re-marriage is frowned upon, widows are often left without any means of support. Hunger and helplessness drives them to beg and they often become victims of horrific abuse, made even more difficult when there are young children involved. In the future, our plan is to have widow’s homes alongside our children’s homes where each can play a positive role in each others lives.

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